Thoughts of Ernest Hemingway

Ernest Hemingway, in full Ernest Miller Hemingway, (born July 21, 1899, Cicero  Illinois, U.S.—died July 2, 1961, Ketchum, Idaho), American novelist and short-story writer, awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1954. He was noted both for the intense masculinity of his writing and for his adventurous and widely publicized life. His succinct and lucid prose style exerted a powerful influence on American and British fiction in the 20th century. Here are few Thoughts of Ernest Hemingway.

0
359
Ernest Hemingway

Ernest Hemingway, in full Ernest Miller Hemingway, (born July 21, 1899, Cicero  Illinois, U.S.—died July 2, 1961, Ketchum, Idaho), American novelist and short-story writer, awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1954. He was noted both for the intense masculinity of his writing and for his adventurous and widely publicized life. His succinct and lucid prose style exerted a powerful influence on American and British fiction in the 20th century. Here are few Thoughts of Ernest Hemingway.

Thoughts of Ernest Hemingway

  1. The world breaks everyone, and afterward, some are strong at the broken places.
  2. The best way to find out if you can trust somebody is to trust them.
  3. An intelligent man is sometimes forced to be drunk to spend time with his fools.
  4. I love sleep. My life has the tendency to fall apart when I’m awake, you know?
  5. There is nothing noble in being superior to your fellow men. True nobility lies in being superior to your former self.
  6. Courage is grace under pressure.
  7. Never go on trips with anyone you do not love.
  8. I like to listen. I have learned a great deal from listening carefully. Most people never listen.
  9. Always do sober what you said you’d do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut.
  10. But man is not made for defeat. A man can be destroyed but not defeated.
  11. For a true writer, each book should be a new beginning where he tries again for something that is beyond attainment. He should always try for something that has never been done or that others have tried and failed. Then sometimes, with great luck, he will succeed.
  12. All things truly wicked start from innocence.
  13. When people talk, listen completely. Most people never listen.
  14. There is no friend as loyal as a book.
  15. There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed.

Few more Thoughts of Ernest Hemingway

  1. Happiness in intelligent people is the rarest thing I know.
  2. Every man’s life ends the same way. It is only the details of how he lived and how he died that distinguish one man from another.
  3. If you are lucky enough to have lived in Paris as a young man, then wherever you go for the rest of your life it stays with you, for Paris is a moveable feast.
  4. Never mistake motion for action.
  5. We are all apprentices in a craft where no one ever becomes a master.
  6. ‘For Whom the Bell Tolls’ was a problem which I carried on each day. I knew what was going to happen in principle. But I invented what happened each day I wrote.
  7. From things that have happened and from things as they exist and from all things that you know and all those you cannot know, you make something through your invention that is not a representation but a whole new thing truer than anything true and alive, and you make it alive, and if you make it well enough, you give it immortality.
  8. There is no hunting like the hunting of man, and those who have hunted armed men long enough and liked it, never care for anything else thereafter.
  9. There is no lonelier man in death, except the suicide, than that man who has lived many years with a good wife and then outlived her. If two people love each other there can be no happy end to it.
  10. Prose is architecture, not interior decoration, and the Baroque is over.
  11. I love to go to the zoo. But not on Sunday. I don’t like to see the people making fun of the animals, when it should be the other way around.
  12. Once writing has become your major vice and greatest pleasure, only death can stop it.
  13. As you get older it is harder to have heroes, but it is sort of necessary.
  14. In modern war… you will die like a dog for no good reason.
  15. Hesitation increases in relation to risk in equal proportion to age.

Other Thoughts of Ernest Hemingway

  1. Switzerland is a small, steep country, much more up and down than sideways, and is all stuck over with large brown hotels built on the cuckoo clock style of architecture.
  2. I never had to choose a subject – my subject rather chose me.
  3. The shortest answer is doing the thing.
  4. About morals, I know only that what is moral is what you feel good after and what is immoral is what you feel bad after.
  5. You see, I am trying in all my stories to get the feeling of the actual life across – not to just depict life – or criticize it – but to actually make it alive. So that when you have read something by me, you actually experience the thing. You can’t do this without putting in the bad and the ugly as well as what is beautiful.
  6. I wake up in the morning and my mind starts making sentences, and I have to get rid of them fast – talk them or write them down.
  7. What is moral is what you feel good after, and what is immoral is what you feel bad after.
  8. All my life I’ve looked at words as though I were seeing them for the first time.
  9. When you have shot one bird flying you have shot all birds flying. They are all different and they fly in different ways but the sensation is the same and the last one is as good as the first.
  10. Decadence is a difficult word to use since it has become little more than a term of abuse applied by critics to anything they do not yet understand or which seems to differ from their moral concepts.
  11. Man is not made for defeat.
  12. When I have an idea, I turn down the flame, as if it were a little alcohol stove, as low as it will go. Then it explodes and that is my idea.
  13. His talent was as natural as the pattern that was made by the dust on a butterfly’s wings. At one time he understood it no more than the butterfly did and he did not know when it was brushed or marred.
  14. Never think that war, no matter how necessary, nor how justified, is not a crime.
  15. You’re beautiful, like a May fly.

Miscellaneous Thoughts of Ernest Hemingway

  1. A writer of fiction is really… a congenital liar who invents from his own knowledge or that of other men.
  2. I know war as few other men now living know it, and nothing to me is more revolting. I have long advocated its complete abolition, as its very destructiveness on both friend and foe has rendered it useless as a method of settling international disputes.
  3. There’s no one thing that is true. They’re all true.
  4. When you go to war as a boy, you have a great illusion of immortality. Other people get killed, not you… Then, when you are badly wounded the first time, you lose that illusion, and you know it can happen to you.
  5. I’m not going to get into the ring with Tolstoy.
  6. It’s none of their business that you have to learn how to write. Let them think you were born that way.
  7. I always rewrite each day up to the point where I stopped. When it is all finished, naturally you go over it. You get another chance to correct and rewrite when someone else types it, and you see it clean in type. The last chance is in the proofs. You’re grateful for these different chances.
  8. The world is a fine place and worth the fighting for and I hate very much to leave it.
  9. All good books have one thing in common – they are truer than if they had really happened.
  10. To be a successful father… there’s one absolute rule: when you have a kid, don’t look at it for the first two years.
  11. All our words from loose using have lost their edge.
  12. Why should anybody be interested in some old man who was a failure?
  13. Writing and travel broaden your ass if not your mind and I like to write standing up.
  14. I don’t like to write like God. It is only because you never do it, though, that the critics think you can’t do it.
  15. When writing a novel a writer should create living people; people not characters. A character is a caricature.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here